Hereditary! Toni Collette, as always, kills it! Oh yeah, some Ancient Rome edification.

Hereditary.PNG

Normally, the movies we talk about on the podcast are films that I had seen before. Not this one. This was the first time seeing this beauty. And all I can say is… wow!

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Movies of the Damned!!

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Ancient Rome

This interesting little fact is something I read over and over in different books, fiction, and non-fiction.

Romans ate their meals lying down. I know you’ve seen in those movies set in the past where people were lounging while slaves fed them grapes around a pool filled with floating flower petals. Now that did happen, so I wouldn’t say it was historically inaccurate but I will say it wasn’t a common occurrence. The lying down part was common. Lying down on your side and eating food was how they ate back then.

I couldn’t imagine leaning on an elbow and shoveling food in my mouth. Wouldn’t your arm fall asleep? Makes my neck hurt thinking about it.

This habit was so ingrained that Cato, a senator protesting some decision or inaction in the Senate, decided that he would eat all his meals seated on a chair and at a table. That was his protest! Love this stuff.

Support me by buying my books, following my blog, subscribing to our YouTube channel and our podcast. Here are some links:

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End of the world novella titled, Balance and;

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Have a great week! Be kind to everyone!

Great Stories… Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl. And more Ancient Rome.

Roald

My son recommended this story to me. I was like, Roald Dahl? The children’s author? And he said, yeah, but this is no kid’s story. And he was right.

SPOILERS INCOMING!

This story had a Victorian-era feel to it. The dutiful wife at home, awaiting her husband to return from work so she could give him a drink and feed him while he relaxes on a chair. She loves him. The author made that very clear. And when he comes home and quickly downs a drink and refills the glass with more whiskey, she worries for him. She thinks it might have something to do with work. We learn he is a police officer and works long days.

The problem is not his work. The problem is her. We don’t learn what he tells her, only that it changes their relationship. He promises to look after her and the child she is carrying, but would she please not make a fuss as it would look bad for him at work?

Shocked, she doesn’t want to believe it. To distract herself from her thoughts, she falls back into routine. She plans to make him dinner. She goes to the freezer and gets a frozen leg of lamb. On her way to the kitchen, she sees her husband standing at the window, with her back to her, looking outside. She caves his head in with the frozen leg of lamb.

Now what? Well, she is, was married to a police officer, and she knows what happens to murderers. She is ready to accept that punishment, but what about her child? What would happen to her child?

She plans. She places the lamb in the oven. She goes to the market, rehearsing what she will say to the grocer to appear natural and not upset. She does a good job, returns home and calls the police. They show up and they are people she knows. She tells them she put the lamb in the oven and went to the market. When she returned, her husband was dead.

The police noticed blood on the back of his head. They call in the detectives. They call in the doctor. They are looking for the murder weapon. It had to something heavy. Maybe a sledgehammer. Once they find the weapon, they’ll find the perpetrator.

They search the house all evening. The police tell her that her lamb may soon burn. She removes it from the oven and pleading that she isn’t hungry and that the food will go to waste; she convinces them to eat the lamb. They do. They eat the murder weapon. They eat the evidence.

Wow!

WHAT I LEARNED:

  1. This was roughly a five-page story. Just think how much information the author crammed into that small space. Once again, the ability to be clear and succinct is an important and powerful skill to gain.
  2. Roald Dahl writes one hell of a suspense story. Even though the wife murdered the husband, the reader felt empathy toward her. I didn’t want her to get caught. I wanted her to pull it off. The suspense was not knowing if she could do so.

This was a fun, short tale that hit like a punch to the face. Well worth the read.

Ancient Rome

At its peak, under Emperor Trajan in the years 98 A. D-117 A. D., the Roman Empire encompassed approximately 5 million square kilometers. It stretched from the deserts in Africa to Northern England.

They estimate the population for that time period to be 65 million people. Roughly double of Canada’s entire population.

REMP

Have a great week. Be kind to everyone!

Support me by buying my books, following my blog, subscribing to our YouTube channel and our podcast. Here are some links:

The Bestselling Doll House  and;

Horror Talks top ten horror books of 2018, The Tracker and;

End of the world novella titled, Balance and;

The newest book available for preorder, Off the Grid!

Pro Tip: If you type in PREORDER2019, you’ll get an extra 15% off.

Podcast:

Listen here: Movies of the Damned!!

YouTube it here: Movies of the Damned!! YouTube

American Werewolf in London! Awww Yeah! Plus, some Ancient Rome, some Star Wars.

WerewolfLondon

I love this movie. I used to have nightmares from this movie, but not about the werewolf. I had nightmares from the nightmares of the main character. Yeah. Weird and awesome.

Listen here: Movies of the Damned!!

YouTube it here: Movies of the Damned!! YouTube

Ancient Rome!!! And Star Wars…

Ok, hear me out. In Star Wars, the political system was a republic of free planets. These free planets talked over issues, tried to resolve them through debate, and then they would vote on the issues. We see this in The Phantom Menace and they reference this political framework throughout the rest of the films. The evil begins with the Emperor becoming a dictator and making the Senate pretty much useless. 

Ancient Rome began as a monarchy with a senate (the Latin origin of this word means an old man, men). The king would ask for advice but didn’t have to use it. After a couple of jerk kings, Rome became a Republic. Yeah, that’s right. A Republic.

The Senate would advise two men (consuls) who shared power for only a year at a time. This was to prevent one man from having too much power. Now there is a lot more to it than that. These were typically rich, aristocrats looking after their own interests and to hell with the poor. But this Republic, thanks to Julius Caesar, became an Empire, ruled by, you guessed it, an Emperor.

Interesting historical note: Julius Caesar was never an emperor. He maneuvered himself into the position of dictator for life. It was his successor, and the boy he had adopted, Gaius Octavius Thurnius, after a bitter fight with Marc Anthony, who became the first Emperor of Rome, turning Rome into an Empire. 

Did George Lucas model the Star Wars political universe, the main reason for antagonism, on the political system of Ancient Rome? I don’t know. But the similarities are striking.

Ancient Rome rules!

Support me by buying my books, following my blog, subscribing to our YouTube channel and our podcast. Here are some links:

The Bestselling Doll House  and;

Horror Talks top ten horror books of 2018, The Tracker and;

End of the world novella titled, Balance and;

The newest book available for preorder, Off the Grid!

Pro Tip: If you type in PREORDER2019, you’ll get an extra 15% off.

Have a great week! Be kind to everyone!

 

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